Chandon Rosé

My husband and I visited Domaine Chandon in 2009, mainly because of the beautiful grounds surrounding the tasting room. The winery was founded in 1973 by Moët & Chandon, and they draw heavily on their French heritage.

I am not a big fan of sparkling wines but I was pleasantly surprised by a symphony of fruity, seductive flavours produced by their expert winemaker Tom Tiburzi. He has spent the last 21 years at Domaine Chandon creating Chandon’s diverse sparkling wines.

This year, Domaine Chandon had a booth at the California Wine Fair in Calgary and we had a chance to chat with Tom Tiburzi. We tasted their Brut Classic and Chandon Rosé this time. I wasn’t able to find this bubbly in our local wine stores, so I brought a bottle from the States this spring. In hindsight, I should have brought more than one bottle. What was I thinking?!?

This week, the temperature finally rose to 30 degrees C, so we sampled chilled Chandon Rosé. It was heavenly! Oops, maybe that’s not the proper term…. Anyway, the Chandon Rosé is a fragrant sparkling wine, very fruity, yet not very sweet. It’s crisp and refreshing, with a nice berry finish. This vibrant, fruity bubbly pairs well with seafood and shellfish. At $22.00 per bottle, it’s a great value.

Winemaker’s Notes

“In the glass, the color is a dramatic deep pink with a blush of sunset. Intense ripe strawberry, juicy watermelon, and fresh red cherry fruit aromas and flavors are interwoven with apple, pear, and stone fruit. On the palate, the wine is creamy and seductive, with defined structure from the addition of still Pinot Noir at tirage. The overall impression is one of bold vibrancy and impact from start to finish.”

– DJ

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Kale and Boiled Potatoes

When the weather is around 30 degrees C, we like to cook Mediterranean food because it’s very light. This side dish goes well with any kind of fish, or a vegetarian burger or scrambled tofu. When buying kale, look for crisp and dark greens. Avoid those that are wilted or have yellow or brown spots. Young greens can be stir-fried, steamed, or sauteed briefly.

1 bunch Kale
3 medium potatoes, peeled and chopped
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 garlic cloves, minced
Salt and pepper

1. Cook the potatoes in salted water until soft. Drain.
2. Rinse kale well in a large bowl of warm water. Drain in colander.
3. Use the leaves only. Trim away tough stem ends by making a “V-shaped” cut at stem end. Save the stems for vegetable stock! Cut the leaves into small pieces.
4. Heat one tablespoon of olive oil in a large skillet and add the pieces of kale. Cook and stir over medium-high heat 4 to 5 minutes until wilted and tender (older leaves may take slightly longer).
5. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a small skillet. Add minced garlic and saute for a few minutes.
6. Add potatoes and garlic to kale, stir and heat through. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Creamy Potato Soup

This recipe has been in our family for generations. It’s delicious, creamy and so comforting on a cold day. We like to eat it with grilled cheese or French bread.

3 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons all purpose flour
1 pound Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and chopped
2 carrots, peeled and sliced
3 cups water (or more, if needed)
3 Bay leaves
2 teaspoons Vegeta (or seasoning salt)
Salt and pepper to taste
4 tablespoons sour cream
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

First, make a roux (pronounced “roo”). Roux is a basic thickening agent used when making stews, soups and sauces. Traditional roux recipes call for equal parts of butter and flour, but in this creamy potato soup we prefer to use olive oil.

1. Heat oil in a pan. Turn the heat down to medium. Add the flour gradually and stir constantly. It should be smooth with no lumps. Keep stirring until the flour is light brown. Make sure it doesn’t burn.
2. Remove from heat and add water. Be very careful, the roux will be extremely hot, and when you add water, be careful not to splash yourself or get burned.
3. Add potatoes, carrots, Bay leaves, salt, pepper and Vegeta.
4. Bring to a boil and simmer for 25 to 30 minutes or until the potatoes and carrots are soft.
5. Mash with a potato masher instead of using a blender.
6. Stir in sour cream and parsley, and remove Bay leaves. For a vegan version of this soup, omit sour cream. The soup is still very yummy.
7. Serve hot with a slice of fresh French bread or grilled cheese.

African Yam Stew

This recipe originally called for chicken. That’s not something you’re gonna find in our house, so we adapted it until it was delicious and still super filling. The peanut butter adds a lovely creaminess. The yam, peas and chickpeas are there to remind you that it’s healthy dish, even though it tastes like comfort food. It’s been cold, rainy and gloomy here, so this dish has been nice to dig into!

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 large yam, peeled and diced
4 carrots
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon chili flakes
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cup vegetable broth
1 1/2 cup water
1 cup frozen peas
3 tablespoons natural peanut butter
1 can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
2 tablespoons fresh, chopped parsley

1. Heat oil in a large frying pan. Add chopped onion and saute for 4 minutes.
2. Add carrots and saute for an additional 4 minutes. Add garlic, yam, cumin, chili flakes, coriander and fry for a few minutes, stirring frequently.
3. Mix in vegetable broth and water, cover, bring to a boil and let simmer for 10 minutes.
4. Stir in the peanut butter, frozen peas and chickpeas. Bring to a boil and simmer for 5 more minutes. Make sure the peanut butter is well blended.
5. Remove from heat, add salt if needed, and garnish with 2 tablespoons of fresh parsley.